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Pumpkin Masoor Dal with Chili Garlic Relish

4 Dec

Pumpkin Masoor Dal

The orange and pink of pumpkin and red lentil, steeped in the gold of turmeric: happy-hued pumpkin masoor dal is just what you need for warmth and cheer this season.

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Pumpkin Kala Chana, Bengali Style

20 Sep

Pumpkin Black Chickpea Curry

A pumpkin kala chana (black chickpea) preparation infused with the Bengali flavors of panch phoron and mustard oil. Dried bay leaves lend a subtle aromatic base to the curry, jaggery brings out the pumpkin’s sweetness, raw mango powder gives it tang. (more…)

Bihari Aloo Chana: Potato and Black Chickpea Curry

28 Jul

Bihari Aloo Chana

Aloo chana is an easy-to-cook recipe from Bihar that uses kala chana (black chickpea) – the smaller, thicker-skinned sibling of the chickpea used in channa masala or hummus. Black chickpea has an earthy, dense flavor and high roughage content. This dish is filling, a good source of carbs, protein and iron – besides being really tasty.

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Potato Adzuki Bean Curry

18 May

Potato Adzuki Bean Curry

A hearty potato adzuki bean curry with a burst of Indian spices and flavors.

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Kathal ki Sabzi: Raw Jackfruit Curry

1 Apr

Kathal ki sabzi (raw jackfruit curry) is an Indian vegetarian delicacy cooked especially around the month of Holi, when jackfruit is in season in north India.

Newbie cooks, be warned – you are up for a challenge if want to make kathal ki sabzi. The prickly, tough-skinned jackfruit requires skill to peel and cut, and then takes ages of cooking time. Part of the hurdle is handled these days – supermarkets stock packs of peeled and chopped jackfruit, ready to cook. Go right ahead and pick up one of these packs if you can. If not, I’ll point you to the always-awesome Rak’s Kitchen for illustrated steps to peel a jackfruit.

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Meethe Chawal: Jaggery-Sweetened Rice

3 Sep

Every time I watch a rerun of Sooryavansham on TV (laugh if you will, I enjoy that film quite a bit) I am struck by the scene in which Radha covers up for the lack of supplies in her kitchen by preparing meethe chawal. Celluloid can inspire us in unexpected ways, as this post is proof. My story may not be as dramatic as that of families reuniting tearfully after watching Sansar (a real effect of the film in the year of its release, I’m told), but it’s still worth telling for those in a culinary quandary similar to mine.

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